YOUNGEST HALL OF FAME DONOR THEO HALE CELEBRATES 21ST BIRTHDAY WITH 50TH DONATION

DAYTON, Ohio – Theodore Hale, the youngest donor ever inducted in the Fresenius Kabi National Donation Hall of Fame, is now a legal adult. He celebrated his 21st birthday on Oct. 22 in the best way he could imagine – making his milestone 50th lifetime donation at the Dayton Community Blood Center.

Community Blood Center nominated Theo for the Hall of Fame because of his irrepressible energy and enthusiasm for helping others. He was eager to begin donating blood when he turned 16 but struggled to pass screening. He refused to quit and is now one of CBC’s youngest platelet donors.

“It’s a culmination of hard work and determination,” said Theo, who has been diligently planning to complete his milestone on his birthday. “I wanted to get to it for a long time. I didn’t realize I had the opportunity for it to fall on my birthday. But I saw that if I could get one donation a week, I could get it on my birthday. Let’s go for that!”

Theo was a star student and Special Olympian at Fairmont High School and will soon complete his studies at Sinclair College. His birthday celebration plans Thursday included skipping his online classes at Sinclair to have lunch with a friend and his first beer on the house.

He’ll have a birthday dinner with his family on Saturday night. His parents Joe and Jennifer Hale of Kettering have been celebrating Theo’s achievements ever since adopting him from a Bulgarian orphanage when he was 15 months old.

Before his nomination to the Donation Hall of Fame at the age of 19, Theo stated his goal was to reach 1,000 lifetime donations.

“It’s been five years,” Theo said about his career as a blood donor. “It was late when I was 16 because I got deferred for so long. I tried when I first turned 16 and it was 10 months before I finally could.”

“I finally got to 50,” he said. “My goal is still 1,000. Hey, I’ve done 5% of it now!

McFRIDAY BLOOD DRIVE OCT. 23 AT DAYTON CBC

DAYTON, Ohio – Donors can help Community Blood Center overcome critical challenges to the blood supply by supporting the McFriday Blood Drive Friday, Oct. 23 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Dayton CBC Donation Center, 349 S. Main St.

Everyone who registers to donate will receive a free coupon for any McDonald’s sandwich. Dayton McDonald’s Operator Debbie Wright is sponsoring the McFriday Blood Drives every Friday in October. Donors must make an appointment at www.DonorTime.com or call (937) 461-3220.

Registered donors also receive the “Wake Up It’s Time to Support the Fight” t-shirt honoring October Breast Cancer Awareness Month or can choose a t-shirt design from earlier in the “Wake Up & Donate Sleep Number Bed Blood Drive” campaign.  Oct. 31 is the final day to enter the drawing to win a Sleep Number bed, sponsored exclusively by Sleep Number, by registering to donate.

Type O blood remains in high demand, and in short supply. The shortage is related specifically to collections limited by smaller blood drives and fewer first-time donors. Many businesses, organizations and high schools have cancelled blood drives due to COVID-19 restrictions or are hosting blood drives at reduced capacity.

Hospital usage of COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP) has surged and CBC is calling on CCP donors to “Fight, Heal, & Give.” The antibody-rich plasma from those who have recovered from COVID-19 is vital for the treatment of coronavirus patients. CCP donors will receive the “COVID-19 Crisis Warrior” t-shirt.  Learn more and register to donate CCP at www.GivingBlood.org or call (937) 461-3220.

‘CRISIS WARRIORS’ NEEDED TO DONATE CONVALESCENT PLASMA

DAYTON, Ohio – The rising number of coronavirus cases has triggered peak demand for COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP) and Community Blood Center needs more COVID-19 survivors to donate. Learn more about CCP and become a “Crisis Warrior” by registering to donate at www.GivingBlood.org or call (937) 461-3220.

Last week area hospitals performed the highest number of CCP transfusions since CBC launched Ohio’s first CCP collection program in early April.

The antibody-rich plasma from people who have recovered from the coronavirus is vital for the treatment of critically ill COVID-19 patients. CBC must expand the base of eligible donors to meet the increasing demand and help save the lives of those fighting the disease

Potential CCP donors must have tested positive for COVID-19 by the RNA test or tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies by blood test and must be completely recovered.

All CCP donors will receive the “COVID-19 Crisis Warrior” t-shirt.

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to hamper all blood drive collections. Type O positive is the most common blood type and continues to be in demand. The short supply is related to high usage, but also to collections limited by smaller blood drives and fewer first-time donors.

Donors can help CBC protect against COVID-19 by wearing a face mask and maintaining social distancing at blood drives.

WHY CBC HAS A CRITICAL NEED FOR CCP

A surge in regional hospital usage of CCP during the week of Oct. 12 depleted CBC’s on-hand supply of CCP, specifically the high-demand AB and B blood types.  CBC responded by importing CCP from blood centers outside the region and making an urgent appeal for more CCP donors.

  • During the week of Oct. 12 area hospitals performed the highest number of CCP transfusions since CBC launched Ohio’s first CCP collection program in early April.
  • From April 6 through Oct. 19 CBC has shipped 1,471 doses of CCP. (1,386 to local hospitals, only 85 doses outside the region).
  • During the week of Oct. 12 CBC collected CCP from 32 donors but shipped 178 doses.
  • CBC faced a shortage of CCP in types AB and B and was forced to import 67 CCP units from blood centers outside our region.
  • CBC collected CCP from 12 donors on Monday, Oct. 19 (including the University of Dayton Warrior CCP Blood Drive) and shipped 79 doses.

FACTS ABOUT CCP USAGE:

  • One CCP donation can usually be divided into 3 doses.
  • Depending on severity of their illness and response to treatment some patients may receive two or more doses.

 FACTS ABOUT CCP DONATIONS:

  • Because of the immediate need, CCP donors are permitted to donate every two weeks. (The normal plasma guideline is every four weeks).  After four donations they must take one month off from donating.
  • Potential CCP donors must have tested positive for COVID-19 by the RNA swab test or tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies by blood test and must be completely recovered. (Symptom free for 28 days).
  • Go to www.GivingBlood.org to find our more about CCP donations and to register to donate, or call (937) 461-3220.

DONORS SUPPORT MCFRIDAY BLOOD DRIVE IN TIME OF CRITICAL NEED

DAYTON, Ohio – The third “McFriday’s Blood Drive” of October was an important day of giving at the Dayton Community Blood Center.  Faced with a critical need for blood and a specific shortage of type O positive, the Dayton CBC Donation Center totaled 148 donors Friday, Oct. 16 and another 61 donors on Saturday, Oct. 17.

The timing was critical. One emergency surgery alone over the weekend used 19 units of type O positive. Hospital inventory of type O positive remains in low supply and CBC is continuing the call for donors.

The next McFriday’s Blood Drive is Friday, Oct. 23 at the Dayton CBC. Everyone who registered to donate will receive a free coupon for any McDonald’s sandwich. Dayton McDonald’s Operator Debbie Wright is sponsoring the McFriday Blood Drives every Friday in October. Donors must make an appointment at www.DonorTime.com or call (937) 461-3220.

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to hamper all blood drive collections. Type O positive is the most common blood type. The short supply is related to high usage, but also to collections limited by smaller blood drives and fewer first-time donors.

Donors also receive the “Wake Up It’s Time to Support the Fight” t-shirt honoring October Breast Cancer Awareness Month or can choose a t-shirt design from earlier in the “Wake Up & Donate” campaign.  All registered donors are entered in the drawing to win a Sleep Number bed.  The final day to enter is Oct. 31.

Donors can help CBC protect against COVID-19 by wearing a face mask and maintaining social distancing at blood drives. Scheduling appointments throughout the week will help CBC maintain adequate staffing and reduce waiting.

OCTOBER IS A VITAL TIME TO DONATE:

  • CBC continues to see cancelled blood drives and frequent blood shortages. Many businesses and organizations cannot host blood drives due to continued COVID-19 related interruptions.  High schools with remote learning have cancelled blood drives, and high school blood drives still scheduled are at reduced capacity. More than 85% of CBC collections come from mobile blood drives, including 17% from high schools.
  • “Cancer is not cancelled” by COVID-19. Blood component transfusions are vitally important for the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma patients. October is the traditional time to remember that blood products are especially important for those fighting breast cancer and all forms of the disease.
  • CBC is seeking COVID-19 survivors to become “Crisis Warriors” by donating their antibody-rich plasma for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. CCP donors will receive the “COVID-19 Crisis Warrior” t-shirt.  Learn more and register to donate CCP at www.GivingBlood.org or call (937) 461-3220.

UD TURNS COVID-19 OUTBREAK TO GOOD WITH WARRIOR CONVALESCENT PLASMA BLOOD DRIVES

DAYTON, Ohio – The Marianist tradition of linking learning and scholarship with leadership and service is alive and well at the University of Dayton. More than ever in the time of COVID-19.

On Oct. 13 UD launched a joint effort with Community Blood Center to collect COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP) for the treatment of coronavirus patients from students who have recovered from coronavirus infection.

An outbreak of COVID-19 cases on campus in August triggered fast action, including the postponement of in-person classes. As they resumed with caution in late September the university looked for ways to turn a potential threat into a way to help the community.

UD first directed students to CBC for information about donating CCP then scheduled a series of “University of Dayton Warrior Convalescent Plasma Blood Drives” on campus. Messages about the CCP blood drives went out to all students and alumni.

The first CCP “Warrior” to donate Monday, Oct. 13 at the UD RecPlex was U.D. alumnus Sydney Jackson. Sydney first donated blood at Vandalia-Butler High School, graduated from U.D. in 2017, and now works in digital marketing at Reynolds & Reynolds.

Potential CCP donors must have tested positive for COVID-19 by the RNA test or tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies by blood test, and must be completely recovered.

Sidney got the email about the Warrior blood drive on her mobile phone and made an appointment.

“My positive test was in mid-August,” she said. “I think I got it from the gym. The symptoms were too perfect, I just knew.  I had everything in the book, loss of taste and smell, it was the worst one.”

She said though she had multiple symptoms, “They were not terrible.” She was already working remotely from home. “Quarantine was fine,” she said. “It seemed normal. But when I told my co-workers they were so shocked!”

Sydney had a history of six blood donations with CBC.  Her sister is a senior at UD and returning to campus for the Warrior blood drive was an easy decision.

“It’s kind of why I did it,” she said. “It’s familiar, it’s very convenient being here, and I can see my sister!”

Junior Nicole VanVoorhis became the first current UD student to donate when she came to the Oct. 15 UD Warrior Blood Drive. Nicole is from Kettering and made her first blood donation at Chaminade Julienne High School.

“I got it at the end of August,” said Nicole. “I live in a house and three out of four of us got it. My other roommate got it first and was actually much worse than us. She was the only one of us that got a fever. She tested positive, and I just had a little tickle in the back of my throat, and I thought, ‘I totally have it.’ When I tested positive, I wasn’t surprised.”

Nicole said the infection lasted about five days. “It was like a bad cold for me,” she said. “I lost my taste and smell, and that was really odd. I remember lighting a candle and not being able to smell it like I usually could.”

Nicole said she received several emails about donating CCP and knew she had been symptom free for the required 28 days.  She was motivated by the example of her mother, who is a platelet donor with 111 lifetime donations.

“I heard her in the back of my head, saying, ‘You should do this,’” said Nicole. “I knew there would not be a lot of people who could do it or would be able to do it.”

Nicole is majoring in International Studies and Human Rights Studies. She was headed to a philosophy class after her CCP donation. “Our discussions are often about rights, what is a right? Who gets rights?” she said.

It’s a discussion that has gained new relevance during the pandemic. “I used to see people out and about, changing classes,” she said. “Now everyone stays home. I used to spend a lot of time in the lounges with my friends. It’s that lack of interaction now.”

Nicole’s AB positive blood type is in extremely high demand for CCP and her donations was large enough to equal three doses for patients in need.

“I hope more people will do it and realize how much of an impact this can make,” she said. “If they’re afraid to donate – don’t be! Go for it!”

The UD Warrior Convalescent Plasma Blood Drive is Monday, Oct. 19 in the RecPlex.

CBC is seeking COVID-19 survivors to become “Crisis Warriors” by donating their antibody-rich plasma for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. CCP donors receive the “COVID-19 Crisis Warrior” t-shirt.  Learn more and register to donate CCP at www.GivingBlood.org or call (937) 461-3220.

LIGHT THE NIGHT HERO LIV CRINION: BATTLING BLOOD CANCER WITH ‘SWEETNESS & SPUNK’

DAYTON, Ohio – “Cancer is not cancelled” has been the battle cry of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s Dayton Light The Night as it remained steadfast to the mission of fighting blood cancer despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

One adjustment was to make Light The Night a virtual event to take place Thursday, Oct. 15 at 7 p.m. Community Blood Center/Community Tissue Services is a presenting sponsor. Learn how you can support LLS at https://www.lightthenight.org/events/dayton.

Dayton Light The Night 2020 Honored Hero Olivia Crinion is a five-year old from Kettering who was excited to return to in-person kindergarten this fall. She goes by “Liv”, a nickname that captures perfectly a little girl determined to live after being diagnosed with B-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Liv’s mom Deme Crinion shared some of the heartbreak and joy of their family’s journey.

“Liv was diagnosed at four years old,” said Deme.  “Her annual well-child check-up was coming up in March and I had been making a mental list of things I wanted to bring up with her provider. We had noticed some unusual bruising all up and down her shins… kind of like you would see during summer when kids are out climbing and playing. But it was still winter, and she hadn’t been that active. 

She also had a virus a week prior to the appointment that left her very lethargic. Even after “recovering” she didn’t really have the desire to play much.  We also noticed on separate occasions that when sitting on our laps her heart was racing as though she’d been running around the house, but she hadn’t been doing anything active. 

I brought all of this up with Liv’s pediatrician who also noticed Liv looked quite pale.  She ordered some precautionary blood work to check for anemia and at the last minute decided to run a full blood panel just to be safe.  Just a couple hours later and we were being admitted to Dayton Children’s Hospital.”

Can you talk about those early days of diagnosis and treatment?

“To be honest, those first days and even weeks were such a blur,” said Deme.  “So much information was coming at us at once and our world had been flipped upside down in an instant.  It was so hard to see her little body change so quickly during one of the more intense phases of treatment and to feel so helpless as a parent. 

But Liv is a little fighter and there is a reason God made this girl with an equal dose of sweet and SPUNK.  She has been so resilient throughout this road… every nurse commented on what an incredible patient she is and how brave she is during procedures, not crying or complaining. 

She just seems to have an understanding that this is what needs to be done for her to get better.  We count that among many of the graces that we’ve experienced over the past year and a half.  Our faith and incredible community have sustained us from day one and we are so grateful.

Tell us about your family and some of the people who have helped you through this. 

“One of the hardest things during those first days, was that all of our extended family live across the country and it was really difficult not having them physically here with us.  During a time, when it would have been easy to feel alone, we were completely blown away and literally carried by our local church and school community and by incredible friends that are like family to us here.

They covered us in prayer, sat with us in the hospital, delivered meals, swooped in to help with our other children and loved us in ways we didn’t even know we needed.  We are just beyond blessed by the community we have both here and out of state.”

How is Liv’s treatment is going?  How has she kept her spirits up? 

“Liv has moved into the maintenance phase of treatment and is doing really well!  We are so grateful that her body has responded so well. She still has to go in for monthly blood counts, takes chemo meds daily at home and receives a quarterly chemo infusion and lumbar puncture, but overall, she’s able to be a “normal” kid most of the time.   

On days she’s not feeling great we put on our favorite movie, do puzzles, or bake something yummy in the kitchen together. But most days she’s doing well, growing like a weed and will hopefully been finished with treatment next May.”

How has LLS has helped you through this?  Has she enjoyed her role as an Honored Hero? ?

“Prior to COVID Liv was thankfully able to attend both kick-off events in person and the ‘Student of the Year’ finale. She absolutely loved getting dressed up and going to the “fancy” events and talking with this new family.

The LLS team made her and our entire family feel so special.  We will always be thankful for their support and they are one of the first organizations we can now point to when we meet families facing the same diagnosis.”

JOURNEY OF FAITH FINDS PURPOSE IN HOSTING CBC’S FIRST COVID-19 PLASMA COMMUNITY BLOOD DRIVE

SOUTH CHARLESTON, Ohio – A COVID-19 outbreak in the South Charleston community left members of the Journey of Faith Fellowship dismayed and uncertain how to respond.  The answer came Oct. 8 as the church hosted the first community blood drive in the Community Blood Center region to include donations of convalescent plasma for COVID-19 patients.

“Back in July it hit all at once,” said Pastor Charles Wertz. “We had about 30 people come down with COVID. The Lord protected us through the first six months, then boom. We asked, ‘Lord what’s your purpose in this?’ Then we heard about the plasma and it was ‘Hello!’”

In early April CBC became the first blood center in Ohio to collect the antibody-rich plasma from COVID-19 survivors to help treat patients critically ill with the coronavirus. Since then demand from area hospitals continues to grow. CBC’s COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP) program has shipped more than 1,400 doses of CCP collected from 431 donors.

The Journey of Faith blood drive marked the region’s first collection of CCP at a location outside the Dayton CBC Donation Center.  The blood drive totaled 24 whole blood donors and six CCP donors. It helped CBC double the average number of CCP donors for the day.

Church member Miranda Bobst, a nursing student at Cedarville University, took on the task of organizing the blood drive. 

“I saw how the people here at my church were effected by the virus,” Miranda said. “I heard about the plasma and started asking questions. If we can take something this bad and miserable and make it good for the community, we can turn it around and make a difference, however we can.”

Miranda announced the blood drive to her nursing classes at Cedarville and recruited whole blood donors. “Right now, the blood center is in desperate need because people are sick all over,” she said.

Miranda planned to donate whole blood. She had never shown any symptoms of coronavirus infection, but when she took an antibody test, it came back positive.  That meant she was qualified to donate convalescent plasma.

Miranda was the second CCP donor of the blood drive. The first to donate was Journey of Faith member and COVID-19 survivor Rebecca Whited from Springfield.

“I tested positive for COVID on June 30,” said Rebecca. “There was a graduation party and I was a photographer at it, and a lot of us got it.”

To protect her family, Rebecca and her 10-year-old daughter Carly spent three weeks quarantined in a house provided by the county health department. 

“It was pretty rough,” she said. “I ended up in the ER. They said I had viral pneumonia, consistent with COVID-19. They gave me a strong steroid. Three days later I almost went back to the ER, but I held on for the next dose of steroid because I didn’t want to scare my daughter.”

Rebecca was out of work for a month. She said it has taken eight weeks to feel herself again. “I couldn’t really breathe,” she said. “I’m good now, but I couldn’t walk from the back of the store to the front of the store without having to rest.”

She admitted feeling anxious as she walked into the room in the church set up for CCP donors, but she never hesitated.

“Miranda got CBC to come out here,” she said. “This is to turn something bad into something good, to help other people.”

                                                                        ***

CBC is seeking COVID-19 survivors to become “Crisis Warriors” by donating their antibody-rich plasma for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. CCP donors will receive the “COVID-19 Crisis Warrior” t-shirt.  Learn more and register to donate CCP at www.GivingBlood.org or call (937) 461-3220.

IMPORTANT TIMING FOR 2ND OCTOBER MCFRIDAY BLOOD DRIVE AT DAYTON CBC

DAYTON, Ohio – Timing was important for the second “McFriday Blood Drive” of October sponsored by Dayton McDonald’s at the Dayton CBC Donation Center. The Friday, Oct. 9 during a critical need for blood, especially  blood types A positive and O positive, and helped CBC fill all 150 appointments for the day.

Everyone who registers Friday at the Dayton gets a $10 Kroger gift card and one free coupon for any McDonald’s sandwich. CBC will continue the $10 Kroger gift card offer through Saturday, Oct. 10 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Dayton CBC Donation Center. 

Sidney donor Cheryl Boyer celebrated her milestone 50th lifetime donation at the McFriday blood drive. “I didn’t realize it was my 50th until I got here this morning,” she said. “I saw there was a critical need and that’s why I came down. I try to donate every time I can.”

Jacquie Powell form Centerville and her friend Jessica Sosebee from Dayton came together to donate and celebrated together in the Donor Café.

Ed Kraus from Dayton decided it was an important day to donate. “Absolutely,” said Ed. “Being O negative, I want to be here. I used to donate years ago. My wife got me doing it again. She donated 10 days ago. It’s just a little pinch!”

WHIO-TV Newscenter 7 Reporter Ronnell Hunt will have a report on the blood drive and the urgent need to help the blood supply during the COVID-19 pandemic tonight beginning at 5 p.m. on Newscenter 7.

Dayton McDonald’s Operator Debbie Wright is sponsoring the McFriday Blood Drives with a free McDonald’s sandwich coupon for all registered donors every Friday in October at the Dayton CBC.

Nearly 75% of the population is either blood type A positive or O positive.  These blood types are currently in high demand due to excess usage at area hospitals and the impact of the COVID-19 on CBC blood collection.

CBC ENTERS MCFRIDAY BLOOD DRIVE WITH URGENT NEED FOR TYPES A & O POSITIVE

DAYTON, Ohio – Community Blood Center will host the second “McFriday Blood Drive” of October while facing a continued urgent need of blood types A positive and O positive.

Everyone who registers to donate Friday, Oct. 9 from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Dayton CBC Donation Center, 349 South Main St. will receive a $10 Kroger gift card and one free coupon for any McDonald’s sandwich. Donors must make an appointment at www.DonorTime.com or call (937) 461-3220.

CBC will continue the $10 Kroger gift card offer through Saturday, Oct. 10 from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Dayton CBC Donation Center. 

Dayton McDonald’s Operator Debbie Wright is sponsoring the McFriday Blood Drives with a free McDonald’s sandwich coupon for all registered donors every Friday in October at the Dayton CBC.

Nearly 75% of the population is either blood type A positive or O positive.  These blood types are currently in high demand due to excess usage at area hospitals and the impact of the COVID-19 on CBC blood collection.

Donors will also receive the “Wake Up It’s Time to Support the Fight” t-shirt honoring October Breast Cancer Awareness Month or can chose the “Wake Up & Give” or “Time to Save a Life” t-shirt from earlier in the “Wake Up & Donate” campaign.

Registered donors will also be automatically entered in the “Wake Up & Donate” drawing to win a custom comfort Sleep Number bed.  The final day to enter the drawing by registering to donate is Oct. 31.

Donors can help CBC protect against COVID-19 by wearing a face mask and maintaining social distancing at blood drives. Scheduling appointments throughout the week will help CBC maintain adequate staffing and reduce waiting.

OCTOBER IS A VITAL TIME TO DONATE:

  • CBC continues to see cancelled blood drives and frequent blood shortages. Many businesses and organizations cannot host blood drives due to continued COVID-19 related interruptions.  High schools with remote learning have cancelled blood drives, and high school blood drives still scheduled are at reduced capacity. More than 85% of CBC collections come from mobile blood drives, including 17% from high schools.
  • “Cancer is not cancelled” by COVID-19. Blood component transfusions are vitally important for the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma patients. October is the traditional time to remember that blood products are especially important for those fighting breast cancer and all forms of the disease.
  • CBC is seeking COVID-19 survivors to become “Crisis Warriors” by donating their antibody-rich plasma for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. CCP donors will receive the “COVID-19 Crisis Warrior” t-shirt.  Learn more and register to donate CCP at www.GivingBlood.org or call (937) 461-3220.

CBC IN CRITICAL NEED FOR BLOOD TYPES A & O POSTIVE AFTER SPIKE IN TRAUMA CASES

DAYTON, Ohio – Community Blood Center is in critical need of blood types A positive and O positive after a spike in blood usage over the weekend for the treatment of gunshot wounds and trauma.

To encourage donations and help avert a blood shortage, CBC will give a $10 Kroger gift card to everyone who registers to donate Tuesday, Oct. 6 through Saturday, Oct. 10 at the Dayton CBC Donation Center, 349 S. Main St. Donors must make an appointment at www.DonorTime.com or by calling (937) 461-3220. 

Donors can help CBC protect against COVID-19 by wearing a face mask and maintaining social distancing at blood drives. Scheduling appointments throughout the week will help CBC maintain adequate staffing and reduce waiting.

Area hospital used nearly 400 red cell units Friday through Saturday, including nearly 200 type O positive and A positive units. A single trauma case at Miami Valley Hospital required 43 red cell units and 42 plasma and platelet units.

Nearly 75% of the population is either blood type A positive or O positive.  These blood types are currently in high demand and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to hinder CBC blood collection.

OCTOBER IS A VITAL TIME TO DONATE:

  • CBC continues to see cancelled blood drives and frequent blood shortages. Many businesses and organizations cannot host blood drives due to continued COVID-19 related interruptions.  High schools with remote learning have cancelled blood drives, and high school blood drives still scheduled are at reduced capacity. More than 85% of CBC collections come from mobile blood drives, including 17% from high schools.
  • “Cancer is not cancelled” by COVID-19. Blood component transfusions are vitally important for the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma patients. October is the traditional time to remember that blood products are especially important for those fighting breast cancer and all forms of the disease.
  • CBC is seeking COVID-19 survivors to become “Crisis Warriors” by donating their antibody-rich plasma for the treatment of COVID-19 patients. CCP donors will receive the “COVID-19 Crisis Warrior” t-shirt.  Learn more and register to donate CCP at www.GivingBlood.org or call (937) 461-3220.